Cut the Cliches – Episode Six – Sarah Kelly

Apologies for the delay loyal listeners. Life, or more specifically the birth of our first baby, has delayed things slightly on the podcast front. So this will be the last in the first series, but check back in 2019 for our next instalment.

For this one though we tackle, Sports Marketing, which is never far away from the headlines – whether it’s Nike’s campaign with Colin Kaepernick or the fall-out from the sandpaper-gate scandal which rocked Aussie cricket.

In episode six we enlist the help of Sarah Kelly. We caught up with the Associate Professor of Law and Marketing at her University Queensland office to find out why sports sponsorship can be a good investment.

Sarah is also:
Brisbane Lions, Deputy Chair
Global Esports Institute, Director
Sports Analytics, Director
Tourism & Event QLD, Non-exec Director
Wandering Warriors, Director
National Education Advisory Committee AICD, Advisory Member
Speak Study, Director

Sarah leads a global sports innovation accelerator at UQ, and has been a judge and mentor for two of these accelerators, including pitching finals during the NBA Allstars event in LA and the Commonwealth Games.

She has multidisciplinary expertise in marketing, psychology and law and is globally known for her research and consulting in sports management, law and marketing. She is widely published in the sports field, with recent projects including, sports scandal impacts, mega sporting event legacy impacts, sponsorship metrics and esports.

We cover:
– the burgeoning esports sector
– the commercial impact of sports-stars’ indiscretions for sponsors
– the tribal behaviour of fans
– the brand opportunity within female sports
– we touch on the ‘Sandpaper-gate’ scandal
– And the buzz Nike was able to generate with its purpose-marketing Kaepernick campaign.

Episode 6 – Sarah Kelly

Sports Marketing is the topic for episode 6. At University Queensland we caught up with Professor of Law & Marketing, Sarah Kelly, to find out why sports sponsorship is a good investment. The fact it’s a universal language is a good starting point. She is also Brisbane Lions Deputy Chair. We cover the burgeoning esports sector – where she is Director of the Global Esports Institute. The commercial impact of sports-stars’ indiscretions for sponsors, the tribal behaviour of fans, the brand opportunity within female sports, we also touch on the ‘Sandpaper-gate’ scandal which rocked Aussie cricket along with the buzz Nike was able to generate with its purpose-marketing Colin Kaepernick campaign.

Research, lack of commercialisation and Australia’s $315bn opportunity

This article was first published on StartupSoda.

We must choose door A.

The advice of CSIRO’s Data61 chief exec Adrian Turner, presenting a new report during his keynote at D61Live yesterday in Brisbane.

He explained that Australia is at a crossroads. A very important choice will fork our future one way or the other. Door A involves us creating our own digital exports – the stark reality is that we currently lag at just 20% of the rate of our OECD peers in this area.

Australian industry lags behind in data competitiveness

Door B results in lagging further behind, and that’s just the start of the problems that would begin.

It’s an argument which Matt Barrie has been making for a few years. Few of the top 10 most valuable companies in Australia make their own digital products. The youngest of our big four was established in 1911! Scaling and exporting in the digital world becomes harder when this is not the case.

Dr Andrew Charlton from AlphaBeta, one of the authors of the report, added that many of the constraints which Australia previously suffered reduce in a digital economy. Challenges of smaller local market, greater distance between population densities and higher wages matter less when competing on the global stage, so “we need to think differently about comparative advantage”.

Adrian made the point that many of the algorithms we use today, have been around since the 70’s – but “we don’t have the tech talent”, we’re already behind and every day “that delta is only going to grow” added Dr Charlton.

From idea to market

The question across the whole day was how to turn the great research which Australia is responsible for, e.g. Wifi, into a product we can commercialise? How can we bridge the gap between breakthrough and branding, taking the product all the way to market? Why is R&D going down comparatively with other OECD countries?

Aussie public investment in R&D is largely indirect

Brisbane’s Chief Digital Officer, Cat Matson, was keen to emphasise that there’s no one party responsible for Australia succeeding as a country. “It’s about how do we still get everyone together” she added, focusing both on celebrating what we can do fast, while still painstakingly and rigorously testing efficiency and market-fit in the background.

However some of the timeframes imposed by academia for collaboration are too slow. AI specialist from Queensland’s Office of the Chief Entrepreneur, Dr Natalie Rens, spoke of experiences with academia, where it can take a year to form partnerships because of administration. “It’s difficult in Australia as research is tied to universities who typically demand extensive IP agreements and take a 30% equity stake in the end product…we need to be more like the States where it’s a one page agreement, maybe 5% equity and let’s go.”

One solution is to focus on specific problems, entrepreneur Bevan Slattery offered. We need more imagineering and problems with a social license which can be approached from a state and national level, life the Reef. We need to ‘reshot’ and find our solutions through science and innovation – which is what the Data 61 Challenge program is doing with its first mission Food Provenance (managing transparency in supply chain) – it’s about “grabbing great thinking, capital and solutions through partner networks” says Data61’s Ben Sorensen.

Mega Trending

When is a trend not a trend? When it’s a megatrend – typically a large cluster of smaller trends.

Six interconnecting, venn-diagram-piecing trends the latest CSIRO report on the issues focuses on include:

– Intelligent machines
– Digital dividends (improving productivity)
– Data driven
– Burning platforms
– Online burnout
– Reality bites

Six digital megatrends

Discussion around Industry 4.0 and the future of automation, brings a unwarranted amount of scaremongering. The megatrend of ‘intelligent machines’ comes with the harbinger of a stat that 47% of jobs will be taken by automation within a couple of decades. In reality though, jobs redefine and augment with technology rather replace. A lot of the repetitive roles may go, but hopefully this will free up time for humans to be more human and add value through creative thinking and applying the technology in additive manner.

The benefits are clear, Dr Wen Wu explained the Case Crunch (2017) experiment which pitted 100 commercial London lawyers against AI when it came to predicting the outcomes of cases, given all of the facts. Needless to say the robots outperformed their human counterparts 87% accuracy compared with 62%. There are benefits of standardising elements of decision making.

But there are issues around bias both in the way we think about cases, but also those coding the algorithms responsible for coming to these conclusions. Ethics was a bigger issue which Day 2 panels were looking to address. What happens when all of the coders are white men?

It can’t just be in isolation

The final thought should go to Adrian Turner who warned attendees of the danger of having conversations in an echo chamber alone.

We don’t have the answers but data can certainly help and Australia must become more targeted in its approach to claw back its position on the global stage. All of our futures depend on it.

“Part of challenge is in communications, how do we get public to understand that the things that got 27 us years of economic growth aren’t going to get us through the next period.

“I’m more optimistic than ever that we’ll get through. Because we have to. But also because there’s already been a shift in the last three years” since coming back says Turner.

Cut the Cliches – Episode Five – Ben Beath

Digital.

A word which has become increasingly ambiguous. From a periphery channel, to core competency.

Within marketing the digital element of a campaign used to be considered as an after thought. Today brand planning centres around reaching consumers in a digital world.

It still means differing things, depending on who you ask. And for us here at ‘Cut the Cliches’, we turned to a man who has decades of experience in the field, leading his agency since 2009 and the era of mobile, through to the customer experience focus which his 150+ agency has today.

Ben Beath, MD at Loud & Clear helps brands transform internally to become more digitally enabled. Simply put, it’s about taking legacy infrastructure and streamlining the process for today’s increasingly time-poor workforce. This can, and often does involve automation, as we discuss the impact of Industry 4.0 on how jobs are viewed. Ben speaks about how to mesh technology decisions with customer-centred design thinking – we ask him what this means in practice for brands like AGL and FFA that he’s worked with.

Cut the cliches - Commswork - Loud & Clear - Ben Beath

We caught up with Ben, in his central Melbourne office, on one of the floors which the agency has expanded to following its acquisition by US-based global IT consulting group Avanade.

Throughout the podcast we discuss:
– what the acquisition means for Loud & Clear
– what are the most over-used phrases in the industry
– the effects of automation on the workforce
– the rise of customer experience officers in brands and how it’s affecting briefs
– how digital agencies can differentiate themselves in an increasingly crowded market
– and the effect consultancies are having on the conversations he’s having with clients

Next week we have a special on voice search, so tune back in for that.

Until then, enjoy your week.

Episode 5 – Ben Beath

Digital still means differing things, depending on who you ask. So for us at ‘Cut the Cliches’, we turned to a man who has decades of experience in the field, leading his agency through the era of mobile, through to the customer experience focus, which his agency has today.

Ben Beath, MD at Loud & Clear helps brands transform internally to become more digitally enabled. Simply put, he’s taking legacy infrastructure and making processes streamlined for today’s increasingly time-poor workforce. This can, and often does involve automation, as we discuss the impact of Industry 4.0 on how jobs are viewed.

Ben has worked with some of Australia’s leading brands including AGL and FFA, and our man on the ground Liam Fitzpatrick caught up with Ben in his Melbourne office.

Cut the Cliches – Episode Four – Jalaluddin Shaik

When we’re not reading about new technology, it’s fair to say that our head of communications is probably watching sport. And while the AFL/NRL seasons are heading towards their entertaining conclusions, our weekends will soon be revived with the NFL and a summer of cricket. Oh and of course the EPL, sorry, Premier League is also back.

But behind the soap opera-like twists every week, are the coaching teams developing tactics to counter their latest opponents. Studying the game footage takes hours and days of dedication, but there are machine learning technologies which are looking to identify trends across vast data sets (or game film).

Sydney-based GameFace.AI is one of those businesses. Created by sports nut Jalaluddin Shaik, the startup has pivoted from movie analytics and is pioneering a new genre of sports assistance. His background is in AV technologies, having already designed and built large-scale audio and video platforms. Shaik also led engineering teams at Fortune500 companies, such as Intel, Apple, Denon, and Spotify. Now with an entrepreneurial focus, Shaik’s interest lies in applying artificial intelligence to analyse videos.

We caught up with him, prior to the rebrand from FlixSense, at Hub William St in Sydney to hear more about:

– the difference between AI and machine learning
– how FlixSense started what the rebrand means for the direction of the business
– what types of sporting codes is he working with
– how technology is changing the sports we see on TV
– and what effect it’s having at the lower levels of sport
– what’s next for GameFace and sports analytics in general

Next week we speak with Ben Beath, MD at Loud & Clear about the role of digital agencies.

See you then.

Episode 4 – Jalaluddin Shaik

In episode four, ‘Cut the Cliches’ speaks with Shaik from GameFace.AI about the rise of sports analytics.
Host Liam Fitzpatrick catches up with Shaik in Sydney where we discuss the difference between AI and machine learning, how GameFace rebrand is going, how sports teams are increasingly turning to video to support coaching and tactics and what might be next for the use of tech across sporting codes.

We headed to Melbourne for Blockchain APAC and this is what we found…

“The doers will win”.

A rallying-cry, that felt more akin to the opening of a concert than a #Blockchain event, but for local-Melbournian Steve Vallas, it was more of a promise. Just 10 weeks after deciding to go through with his idea, Australia’s largest enterprise blockchain event was here and packed out.

Blockchain technology is big business. But what happens when big business gets serious about the blockchain?

There was a lot of education throughout the sessions as Vallas had ensured there were plenty of use cases for how the technology is affecting industry today.

A need comes before the solution

Aussie champions, Katrina Donaghy and Louise Mercer from Civic Ledger and Everledger respectively, were on hand to talk about their experience with Optus’s Cindy Nicholson.

Louise Mercer explaining “yes we do want to work with corporates”

Donaghy spoke of the need to focus on the customer first. Working together with the Queensland Govt, Civic Ledger discovered a market and had the problem validated first, then “we built out our focus on registry and marketplaces”.

Mainstream success needs collaborative consortiums like ANB

One of the biggest announcements came from Data 61, IBM and law firm Herbert Smith Freehills. As iTNews reported: “The CSIRO’s Data61 research and development shop is set to pilot a new blockchain-based, internet of things (IoT)-enabled platform to streamline the way Australian businesses exchange data, cement deals and work together”.

Business Insider reported Herbert Smith Freehills stating: “The ANB will enable organisations to digitally manage the lifecycle of a contract, not just from negotiation to signing, but also continuing over the term of the agreement, with transparency and permissioned-based access among parties in the network.”

So how do you develop a Proof of Concept (POC) for Blockchain?

Gendry Morales — CEO at Flight Plan, ran attendees through the 4 key steps on how to get your POC up and running.

Flight Plan CEO Gendry Morales

Her biggest pieces of advice were to:

– Drill down into the key customer problems you’re trying to solve and create customer profiles to really ensure you understand their needs.
– Ensure you really understand the reason why you’re using blockchain. Is it for disintermediation? Maybe it might be due to authenticity, permanence or scarcity? It’s crucial you work this out during you planning phases.
– Use a Blockchain Product Canvas (see below) to help you clearly address each element of your POC.

We’re just getting started

Elsewhere a number of speakers compared the situation with blockchain with where the web was in the mid-90’s. “We’re at 1.0”, said Louise Mercer, “so look at where the tech needs to evolve”. There’s a lot of opportunity.

The Red Cross showed its latest collaboration with TypeHuman and FlexDapps for using blockchain to sign up volunteers and authenticate their credentials.

And the energy from both streams was palpable — especially from Jason Lee who spoke about NEM, the non-for-profit platform, which had a couple of startups spruiking its appeal in the shape of Rocket Shoes and Copyright Bank.

Proof of Location on the way….

We were blown away by the knowledge and expertise of Kiersten Jowett, a researcher and blockchain educator.

Talking on the panel ‘Applications and SAAS Use Cases’, Kiersten spoke passionately about a range of topics from Proof of Location and how the Blockchain is more reliable than GPS — through to ways corporates can experiment with the fast-paced tech.

Joined on the panel by Steve Dyso — Partner at Deloitte, Scott Ni — Senior Director at Alibaba and Apurva Chiranewala — Strategy & Growth Lead at Sendle, Kiersten encouraged corporates to get involved in supporting blockchain projects. Her advice: ‘invest in a startup that’s disrupting the market and send your clients to them and then once the market matures absorb them’.

But can Blockchain help humanity?

Well according to Lina Lim — Director Blockchain Philanthropy Foundation, Head of Technology NSX, Chris Zhong — Digital Industry X.0 Blockchain Lead at Accenture and Rose Thompson — Project Manager at ConsenSys APAC it already is.

According to the landscape, Blockchain for Social for Impact is growing pretty quickly:

Rosa Thompson also spoke passionately about the connection between data ownership and the current concentration of power by oligopolies and monopolies.

The ConsenSys Project Manager spoke about how the potential of blockchain could help to distribute power from these multinational corporations by way of data sovereignty.

Rosa Thompson— Project Manager ConsenSys APAC

What comes next?

Murray Galbraith hosted Stephen Alexander from ConsenSys to wrap up proceedings with advice on how to implement what people had learned during the course of the day:

– Jason Potts, professor at RMIT Blockchain Innovation Hub opened the event with a keynote, and Stephen Alexander noted that his offerings contributed to making this one of the most comprehensive, intelligent and insightful blockchain events for applied business blockchain he had experienced. It included observations like “the fulfilment of trust accounts for 35% of the cost and effort across all supply chains today”. Alexander added that when the value of this is captured and tokenised then the tradable market value of trust within that sector alone will amount to billions of new value-based tokens.

– Cindy Nicholson of Optus raised the key question — what is the business value of adopting blockchain? Alexander, said that if you cannot predict, create, capture, validate, tokenise and then trade meaningful value — then it isn’t value, it’s just a vague benefit masquerading as value.

– The future trends of DApp development has been articulated by Joseph Lubin and the future can be summed up in one word…Coexistence.

– He noted that we are just at the beginning of deconstructing legal instruments and embedding them into the DNA of the next generation Internet such as the ethereum. He also explained that we would only need three of these instruments to be in use to aggregate the entire demand chain and for the first time in human history, match that with the existing supply chain via blockchain based exchanges. The era of search would be over. We couldn’t agree more!

– Embrace blockchain yourselves, become sovereign individuals and you can aggregate your collective tribal power says Alexander — in that way we can avoid next year’s event becoming a Groundhog Day.

This article was first published on the Beam Medium page.

Cut the Cliches – Episode Three – Steve Sinha

Data. It’s the new battleground.

We’re producing more than ever – 90% of all data in existence was created in the last two years, according to an IBM Marketing Cloud report. And that was at the end of 2016!

So how can we make the most of it? And what do marketers need to know about those harnessing it?

Cut the Cliches turned to a man who has spent most of his professional life answering those questions. For episode three, our host Liam Fitzpatrick was in Sydney to get the thoughts of Steve Sinha, COO (and acting-CEO) of the Australian Alliance for Data Leadership. Under that umbrella is a host of other organisational acronyms including ADMA, DGA, IAPA, DTC and IQ. His experience spans three decades in the industry across the UK and Australia.

We chatted with him back in the middle of winter, when we both had colds and England were still in the World Cup. (We’ve since witnessed that football did in fact not return home.)

Topics discussed ranged from:

– Steve’s background in media across UK and Australian agencies
– the future role of agencies
– a return to the full service model?
– how marketers can get the best out of their agencies,
– why brands are taking services in-house,
– the rise of customer experience
– the educational offering of AADL
– what’s next for the organisation in the next 12 months.

Next week we speak with Shaik from GameFaceAI about sports analytics.

Tune in then.

Episode 3 – Steve Sinha

Episode three of Cut the Cliches, and host Liam Fitzpatrick is in Sydney to get the thoughts of Steve Sinha COO (and acting-CEO) of the Australian Alliance for Data Leadership.

We chat with him back in the middle of winter, when we both had colds and England were still in the World Cup. Discussion topics ranged from his background, the role for agencies, the changing role for marketers, the rise of customer experience and what’s next for AADL.